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WEST MIDLANDS POLICE GREAT WAR MEMORIAL SITE

 

 

THOMAS BAGGOTT
 

EDWIN BAILEY MM

JOSEPH BAILEY

ARCHIBOLD BAKER

EDWIN JOHN BAKER

GEORGE BAKER

WILFRED BALLINGER

GEORGE  BARBER

HAROLD WILLIAM BARBER

JAMES FREDERICK BARKER

ALBERT WALLACE BARKER                                                                                                                                             FULL REPORT
Somerset Light Infantry cap badge WW1Albert was born 1893 in Kidderminster and in 1901 was living at 38 Cobden Street, Kidderminster.  His father, William Joseph Barker, was a carpet weaver born in Cheshire, married to Eliza, born in Wordsley, Staffs.  Albert had two younger brothers, Percy William, born 1894, and Gilbert Ridness, born 1900, and a sister, Ivy May, born 1899. 
Albert followed his father into the weaving trade, but on 21st September 1914 he joined the Birmingham City Police as PC208 on C Division.  Albert got married on 30th October 1915 to Lucy Kate Baker (nee Turvey) at St Marys Kidderminster then, six weeks later, on 10th December 1915 he enlisted in the army, serving as Lance Corporal 42193 with the 3rd Bn Somerset Light Infantry until 5th August 1918 when he transferred to P/16472 Military Foot Police.  On 25th March 1919 he was discharged from the army and came back to live at 15 Victoria Buildings, Coralie Street, Brookfields, Birmingham.

GEORGE WILLIAM BARKER

GEORGE BARNES

HENRY EDWARD BURGOYNE BARRETT

JAMES ALBERT BARTLETT

JOHN BARTRAM

WALTER THOMAS BARWELL

JOHN BASTABLE

LOUIS BATES

DANIEL BAYLISS

SIDNEY BAYLISS                                                                                                                                                                FULL REPORT
Sidney Bayliss
Sidney Bayliss was born circa 1891 in Whitacre Heath, Coleshill, near Birmingham.  His parents were James and Ann Bayliss, of Nether Whitacre, Coleshill, Birmingham. Sidney's father was a farmer and sub postmaster and the children helped in the post office and on the farm. Sidney was the 6th of 9 children: Thomas, Alfred, Sarah Jane, John, Mary, Sidney, Charles, Arthur and Frank.  The 1911 census shows them living at Whitacre Heath.
Birmingham City Police Records record Sidney joined Birmingham City Police on 27th October 1913 as a 22 year old farmhand.   He served on the 'E' Division with warrant number 8389, collar number PC 67.  On 5th November 1915 Sidney requested to enlist in the Army and Birmingham City Police records dated 12th November 1915 show Sidney was named along with many officers who were granted permission to join H.M. Forces.
He initially joined the 5th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, his service number was 7476 and he later transferred to the 8th Battalion East Surrey Regiment, service number 25157.
Sidney's battalion moved into trenches just east of Grand Court on Friday 23rd February 1917 and moved forward at 2 pm on Monday 26th February 1917 relieving battalions in South Miraumont Trench, Regina Trench and Boom Ravine. At 4.30 am on Wednesday 28th February 1917 a small patrol under 2nd Lieutenant Astington was ordered to make its way up Resurrection Trench from the Irles - Miraumont Road to ascertain what had happened to a previous patrol sent up the night before and of which there had been no news. During the day it was decide to send a further patrol under 2nd Lieutenant Hall and that the two patrols should attack and occupy a nearby German trench. The attack took place at midnight and was entirely successful for the loss of Lance Corporal Rice. The War Diary continues, "This small attack drew a very heavy bombardment from the enemy guns, which spread right and left over a considerable distance, and indicated that the enemy had been expecting that an attack would be made on Irles. Our casualties from this artillery fire were one man killed and two wounded - all of 'A Company'.
At 2.30 am on Friday 2nd March 1917 the battalion made an attack on a German trench running parallel to that held by 2nd Lieutenant Hall and about 100 yards to the north. The War Diary records, "The attack at 2.30 am having been postponed half an hour by Captain Place. It was not a success. 2nd Lieutenant William's platoon, which was taking the east end of the trench, met with heavy machine gun fire and suffered 12 casualties. Sergeant Fidgett's platoon lost its way in the darkness and broken ground and were unable to find the trench. During the day arrangements were made with the 7th Queens Regiment who relieved us that evening. The relief started at 6.30 pm and was carried out quickly and without hitch."
Sidney was wounded in one of these attacks and evacuated to a Casualty Clearing Station at Doullens, where he succumbed to his injuries on 3rd March 1917 at the age of 26.  He is buried in grave G20 at DOULLENS COMMUNAL CEMETERY Extension Number one, Doullens, France.

JAMES EDWARD BEAMAN

THOMAS BEARDSALL

THOMAS BECKETT

WILLIAM BECKETT

GEORGE BEESLEY

FRANCIS BEIRNE

WILLIAM JOHN BELL

ALFRED BENNETT

JAMES BENNETT

HARRY BENTLEY

THOMAS WILLIAM BERRIDGE

WILLIAM BEST

EDWARD STURTON BETTY

THOMAS BILLINGSLEY                                                                                                                                                             FULL REPORT
grenadier guards badgeThomas Billingsley was born in Pattingham, Staffordshire circa 1889.  Birmingham City Police records show Thomas joined Birmingham City Police 23rd May 1910 as a 21 year old labourer, and he served on the ‘A’ Division, with warrant number 7801.  Thomas was a Reservist, however, so must have served in the Army, presumably prior to 1910, and on 5th August 1914 was recalled to the colours at the outbreak of war, enlisting in Wolverhampton.
As Private 13178 in 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, Thomas landed in France on 6th October 1914.  As part of 7th Division, they raced up to Antwerp to cover the withdrawal of the Belgian Army and Royal Naval Division troops, before retiring south to fight the First Battle of Ypres, a success, but at great cost, losing every Commanding Officer and 80% of their original strength by 2nd November. 
On Wednesday 10th March 1915 Thomas's battalion took up reserved positions near Neuve Chapelle in Rue du Bacquerot and Cameron Lane, preparing for an attack the following day. The next day his battalion was sent forward to link up with other battalions in captured German trenches near Moulin de Pietre, their objectives being a road junction called High Trees Corner situated between Mauquissart and Nameless Cottages.   The battalion endeavoured to advance but could make no progress due to the intensity of the enemy machine gun fire encountered.   On Friday 12th March 1915 the battalion resumed their attack and made small headway consolidating all gains during the evening. Little or no progress was made the following day with the battalion having to endure German artillery barrages which caused several casualties. Relief took place that night.  
This was the Battle of Neuve Chappel and casualties for the period amounted to 16 officers and 325 other ranks killed, wounded or missing, amongst them Thomas Billingsley.  He has no known grave and is remembered on Panel 2 of  Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.
 

EDWIN ERNEST BINT

CHARLES BISHOP

ALBERT BLACKWELL

FREDERICK BLAND

FREDERICK WILLIAM BLISS

GEORGE BLOOMFIELD

OSWOLD BLOOR

HENRY (HARRY) BLOOR

HENRY EDWARD BLOOR

RICHARD BLOWER

WALTER CHARLES BOLLINGTON

FRANK SAMUEL BOND

ALFRED WILLIAM BRAGG

FREDERICK BRODERICK

FRANK BROMLEY

DAVID BROWN

GEORGE BROWN

ISAAC BROWN

FRANCIS BRUTON

JOHN EDWARD BRYANT

ALBERT BUBB

ERNEST BUCKBY

HARRY BUDD

STANLEY WILLIAM MAY A BURGESS

GEORGE BULL

TIMOTHY BULLEN

HENRY BENJAMIN BULLOCK

EDWARD BUMFORD

JAMES FRANCIS BUNN                                                                                                                                                                 FULL REPORT
1st Warwicks cap badgeJames Francis BUNN was born in 1887 at St John’s in Leamington, the son of James and Emma Louisa Bunn of 71, Shrubland St, Leamington Spa.  His father was a general labourer.  James was baptised 26 October 1887 in St John the Baptist, Leamington Spa.  He had eight siblings, Frank, William, Annie, Lily, Alice, Lizzie, Harry and Joseph.

James joined the army aged 18 in February 1906, and served in India, where he remained until December 1912.  On his return to the UK he joined the Birmingham City Police Force and remained a member until war broke out in August 1914, when he was recalled to the colours, joining the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

At the beginning of March 1915 James's battalion was in the line in the St Yves sector being relieved to Armentieres on Monday 15th March 1915. A return was made to the front lines on Sunday 21st March 1915 with the battalion taking over positions on the Steenbeek and a reserve line at La Plus Douve Farm in the Wulverghem sector.   From the time the battalion took over responsibility for the trenches, they were continually shelled and sniped at, the War Diary records the events:   "21 March 1915 - Battalion relieved D.C.L.I and Manchester regiments in trenches at Wulverghem in evening. 1 Coy. Argyles attached and placed in reserve at La Plus Douve Farm. 1 killed, 2 wounded.   22 march 1915 - sniping rather active during the morning opposite 'D' Coy. No shelling. 1 Coy. Seaforth Highlanders relieved 'D' Coy in right trench. 'D' Coy relieved Argyles in reserve. 1 killed, 1 wounded."
On the day of James's death the War Diary records, " 'A' Coy trenches were shelled during the morning while some heavies dropped near trenches more to our left.   Sniping very active. During the night of 22/23 rd patrols went out form all Companies but no German movements were located. 1 killed, 4 wounded". James was killed on 23rd March 1915 and is buried in RATION FARM (LA PLUS DOUVE) ANNEXE, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium.

HENRY VICTOR BURCH

JOHN BURKE

THOMAS HENRY BURT                                                                                                                                                                 FULL REPORT
military police corps cap badge
Thomas was born in Hanley Castle, Worcestershire in circa 1879, the son of Charles and Abigail (nee Medens) Burt of Malvern Common, Great Malvern, Worcestershire and later of 1, Laburnum Cottage, Court Road, Elmside, Great Malvern, his father being a domestic gardener.
Thomas joined the cavalry and fought in the Boer War, being at Ladysmith during the seige (Nov 1899-Mar 1900).  But left the army immediately after this, and joined the Worcestershire Police on 16 March 1900 at which time his occupation was given as a groom.
He was initially stationed at Stourport and Acocks Green before being stationed at Billesley, near King’s Heath in 1904.  
Thomas married Louisa Schofield at Ledbury in 1904 and they resided at 1, Chepstow Terrace, Brook Lane, King’s Heath, Birmingham, along with Thomas's older sister, Gertrude, a dressmaker, and Louisa's mother, Elizabeth Schofield, a 76 year old widow. thomas burt grave
When his force joined the Birmingham City Police in the 1911 Annexation, Thomas transferred on 9th November 1911 and served with warrant number 8000 and collar number E209 on the ‘E’ Division.  
When war broke out, Thomas was recalled to the Army at Birmingham on 26th November 1914.  He joined the Mounted battalion of the Military Police Corps and left Birmingham in February 1917 to begin training at Aldershot.  Just a month later, on 27th March 1917, Thomas died from an attack of cerebo-spinal meningitis at Aldershot Barracks.  He was buried, on 2nd April, at Brandwood End Cemetery, Kings Heath, Birmingham.

WILLIAM HENRY BURTON

JOHN WILLIAM BUSH